Versatile Drum Fill Lesson for Beginners

If you’re a seasoned drummer, you’re probably familiar with drum fills, and maybe you’ve even created a few fills of your own. If you’re a new drummer, you might be interested in learning how to play or create a drum fill, or you might not be sure what a drum fill is (and that’s ok!). A drum fill is basically a short rhythmic sound that fills the breaks between phrases of a melody to keep the listener’s attention. Drum fills are also great for getting in a mini-solo.

Whether you’re a seasoned or novice drummer, it’s important to learn and practice drum fills, as you’ll probably use them quite a bit. Self-taught drummer KJ Rias is known for his killer drum fills. They can be a bit advanced, but KJ Rias recently posted a drum fill lesson for beginners on Youtube that we couldn’t help but share. In the video, KJ Rias teaches the “6 Stroke Roll Kick-Pause Fill,” a drum fill he improvised in a previous video.

While the pattern is simple, it’s great for beginners (both to drumming and fills) and as a go-to fill. In the video description, KJ Rias says that it’ll work in almost any song or solo. It’s also easy to play around with and expand on, as KJ Rias demonstrates in the video.

Check out the lesson in the video below and let us know what you think in the comments section!


Video Lesson: How to Play Yankadi on Djembe

New to djembe playing or looking for a new rhythm to play? Allow us to introduce you to the Yankadi rhythm! Yankadi is one of the most popular djembe rhythms, and it’s pretty easy to pick up, making it perfect for beginner djembe drummers.

The Yankadi rhythm is said to originate from the Sosos in Lower Guinea. Traditionally a seduction dance for young women, the slow Yankadi rhythm was often played as young men and women demonstrated their dance moves for one another as a form of flirtation. Yankadi’s sultry rhythm inspired seductive dancing that was ideal for wooing potential spouses, as the way people moved their bodies said a lot about their worth and future potential. Others say the Yankadi rhythm originates from Burkina Faso, where it was played to let people know good places to settle, as “Yankadi” can be translated to “it is good here.”

Today, the Yankadi rhythm is played for a variety of social occasions, but it still tends to inspire seductive dancing in listeners.With its melodic cadence and seductive groove, the Yankadi is a favorite rhythm among both drummers and dancers, and we think it will be a favorite rhythm of yours, too. Find a sneak peek of our Yankadi lesson video below. If you like what you here and want to check out the full lesson, head over to www.x8drums.com.

From Drums to Dedication, What Makes a Great Drummer?

With all of the different styles of drumming and drums available, the world of rhythm is open to anyone who has the desire to be the “heartbeat” of a song or a part of a community drumming event or drum circle. Drumming is one of the most natural, creative vehicles of expression, and once the fire takes hold of a person and his or her drum (or drum set), the groove can be unstoppable. So, what takes a drummer from rocking out into drumming stardom (even among friends and family)? What makes a great drummer?

X8 Community Drummer Spotlight: Darren H.


After growing tired of several years playing in guitar bands I spent quite a while looking for a new musical project to involve myself with. I needed something different to what I had previously done, something which would keep me interested, be fun, sociable and also fun for all involved. On a family shopping trip in the UK last summer, I came across a group of street musicians playing many different types of hand drums/percussion. They caught my attention right away, and I spent the next couple of hours watching them perform while the family went off shopping.

The vibe given off by these musicians was amazing, and you could see how much they, too, were enjoying playing to an appreciative crowd of people. Eventually I plucked up courage to ask one of the drummers about the group, and that was my first knowledge of what a Drum Circle was. I searched the web for a drum circle closer to my home town, but could not find anything at that time, but I did discover a samba band not far from home so I joined them in August 2013.

Through meeting and playing with people in the samba band I recently discovered a new drum circle had been recently set up in the area, so I also joined them just last month. After just three sessions, the group is playing well together. The facilitator teaches us three different rhythms and then splits us into three groups, each group playing a different rhythm, then we change around so eventually all the groups have played all three rhythms. Most of the group play Djembe drums of varying sizes, ranging from very small to extra large! But, we all make an equal contribution to the overall sound of the circle.

I also play a small drum which I purchased from a second hand shop which I believe is of Ugandan origin. I feel that since I became involved in hand drumming, I am more relaxed about life, I look forward to my sessions every week, always come away feeling happy, and also I have met some really nice people in the process.

I would recommend drum circles to anyone who wishes to unwind after a day’s work, or just wishes to meet people and make new friends while doing something fun and enjoyable at the same time. Also, do not be afraid to get involved if you have no drumming experience as most drum circles have a facilitator who can show you the basics needed to get you started in very little time.

X8 Community Drummer Spotlight: Philip W.

I'm seventy years old and I just discovered drumming two years ago. I saw a local group perform and thought, they're having so much fun, I want some of that. I got in touch and joined their beginner's group. It's been a joyride ever since.

When class day arrives, I wake up smiling! The greatest part about drum circles is the inclusivity. Drummers of all levels are welcome and regulars are eager to help beginners. When the rhythm gets rolling, everybody in the groove, the heartbeat of drums syncs with your own. For this older drummer, it's rejuvenating. I can only imagine how the younger folks feel. Why didn't I know about this sooner?

We're very fortunate to have a Djembefola, Bolokada Conde, living in our town, Greenville SC. I found my first drum on Craigslist, but now I own a terrific instrument made…and signed…by Bolokada himself. Look for him near you…he tours internationally. Look around, find a group near you and begin a journey that will inspire and delight as long as you'd like it to…and that will be a long time!

Philip, we wake up smiling on drumming days, too! Thank you for sharing your story with us! Drummers, tell us why YOU love drumming and drum circles! We'd love to share your story, too!