Types of Conga Drums

Conga drums are a versatile set of percussion instruments most noted for their sound in Latin American music. Most Congas are played in pairs, but it is not unusual for congas to be played in any configuration, as well as with other drums such as bongos or percussion like the guiro. Conga drums are of Afro-Cuban descent, marking the fusion of two cultures that have had a vital influence on almost every genre of music today.

Congas are typically seen as three different drums; the conga, quinto and tumbadora. Quinto drums are the smallest of the Conga drums, producing the highest pitch that can be used as an accent or to play an emotional, melodious rhythm. The quinto is the mid-size conga drum that can mimic the higher tones of the quinto, compliment the lower tones of the tumbadora and play mid-range pitches. Tumbadoras are the lowest-pitched of the congas, producing a deep bass tone that may be the most familiar sound of all the Conga sounds.

Congas can be attached to drum stands while the conguero hits the heads and rims with bare hands. The quinto is also able to be strapped to the drummer’s shoulder, allowing portability and movement for performances on stage as well as parades or public venues. Traditional Conga drums are made from wood, and perhaps originated from barrels or tree trunks. Modern Conga drums can be made from wood like ash or oak, with different types of wood producing a range of overtones. Modern congas can also be made with fiberglass for consistent, yet less harmonic sound, and better durability than wood. The drum heads can be made from animal skins like goat or cow, or synthetic materials.


In Latin America, one of the most renowned drums is the Conga drum, from its historical roots in Afro-Cuban music development to its presence in classical Samba or Mambo music. Today, Conga drums can be heard in music from Jazz to Rock to classical music, as well as Latin fusion styles that continue to take the world by storm.